•  

    Click HERE to join our forum and participate in the discussions.

     

Updating the 2.9L Tech Page - Suggestions Needed


88Rangernewbie

New member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
58
Location
I live in Broken Arrow Oklahoma
Vehicle Year
1988
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9 V6
Thank You

Need to let people know that it's not worn cam bearings or air in the lifters
that is causing the infamous ticking.
What is causing the ticking is clogged rocker armshafts that is restricting oil flow, thus causing lifters to wear out and tick because of poor oil circulation.:icon_thumby:
Hey thanks that is what I needed to know!:icon_thumby: I thought I may need to change heads or something,it was driveing me CRAZY!!!!!!!:icon_thumby::icon_cheers: I tryed evrything. ( I thought )
 


88Rangernewbie

New member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
58
Location
I live in Broken Arrow Oklahoma
Vehicle Year
1988
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9 V6
For Sure

For those really NEW to the ranger a nice picture of the infamious "spout" would be good. for when doing tune ups. those who are well seasoned around the ranger, may not think it necessary.
:clapping: I looked for that "spout" thing for 4 hours till I just gave up:icon_confused:
 

88Rangernewbie

New member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
58
Location
I live in Broken Arrow Oklahoma
Vehicle Year
1988
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9 V6
Thank you

Need to let people know that it's not worn cam bearings or air in the lifters
that is causing the infamous ticking.
What is causing the ticking is clogged rocker armshafts that is restricting oil flow, thus causing lifters to wear out and tick because of poor oil circulation.:icon_thumby:
Just what I needed to know
 

Carricks89Ranger

New member
Joined
Dec 21, 2009
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
South Florida
Vehicle Year
1989
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9L
Best way

I found the best way to add power to my 2.9 was to rebuild it. No more ticking. Make sure your lifter bores are clean and free of buildup, make sure your oil filter housing bolt is tight so you dont lose oil pressure to the top of the motor. get a k&n and maybe a coil. My Ranger goes like stink now.
 

loneranger48

New member
1000+ Watt Stereo
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Washington
Vehicle Year
1988
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9L of FUry!
yeah a friend told me he put a K&N on his truck with an MSD coil and now its runs like a raped ape.
 

copperminer2002

New member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
North Central Arizona
Vehicle Year
1988
1988
Vehicle
Ford
Ford
Engine Size
2.9L
Hey Jim, I don't know if you are wamting to add stuff or not, but I found this on Autozone's site. Its how to test your coil.
•Check the ignition switch.
•Connect a 12-volt test lamp from the coil tachometer (tach) terminal to ground.
•Turn on the ignition switch.
•The test light normally should be on. if the test light is off, there is an open circuit in the coil primary winding or in the circuit from the ignition switch to the coil battery terminal. on many chrysler and ford systems, the test light should be off because the module primary circuit is closed. since there is primary current flow, most of the voltage is dropped across the primary coil winding. this action results in very low voltage at the tach terminal, which does not illuminate the test light. on these systems, if the test light is illuminated, there is an open circuit in the module or in the wire between the coil and the module.
•Crank the engine and observe the test light. If the test light flutters while the engine is cranked, the pick-up coil signal and the module are okay. When the test lamp does not flutter, the pick-up and/or module are bad. A pick-up is tested with an ohmmeter. If the pick-up coil is satisfactory, the module is defective. Before testing the pick-up, check the voltage supply to the positive primary coil terminal with the ignition switch on before the diagnosis is continued.
•If the test light flutters, connect a spark plug to the coil secondary wire, and ground the spark plug case. The test spark plug must have the correct voltage requirement for the ignition system being tested.
•Crank the engine and observe the spark plug. If the test spark plug fires, the ignition coil is satisfactory. If the test spark plug does not fire, the coil is probably defective because the primary circuit no-start proved the primary circuit is triggering on and off.
•Connect the test spark plug to several spark plug wires and crank the engine while observing the spark plug. If the test spark plug fired in step 4 but does not fire at some of the spark plugs, the secondary voltage and current is leaking through a defective distributor cap, rotor, or spark plug wires, or a plug wire is open. If the test spark plug fires at all the spark plugs, the ignition system is working fine.
•If the cause of the no-start condition has not yet been found, check the ignition coil with an ohmmeter. If the winding resistance readings are not within specifications, replace the coil or coil pack. If the coils are fine, check the primary circuit for proper voltage.
Ignition Coil Resistance

•With the key off and the battery lead to the ignition coil disconnected, use an ohmmeter to measure the primary and secondary winding resistance of the ignition coil. when checking the resistance across the windings, pay particular attention to the meter reading. if the reading is out of specifications, even if it is only slightly out, the coil or coil assembly should be replaced.
•To check the primary windings, calibrate an ohmmeter on the X1 scale and connect the meter leads to the primary coil terminals to test the winding.

Ohmmeter connected to primary coil terminals.
•An infinite ohmmeter reading indicates an open winding. The winding is shorted if the meter reading is below the specified resistance. Most primary windings have a resistance of 0.5 to 2 ohms, but the exact manufacturer's specifications must be compared to the meter readings.
•To check the secondary winding, calibrate the meter on the X1,000 scale and connect it from the coil's secondary terminal to one of the primary terminals.

Ohmmeter connected from one primary terminal to the coil tower to test secondary winding.
•A meter reading below the specified resistance indicates a shorted secondary winding. An infinite meter reading proves that the winding is open.
•In some coils, the secondary winding is connected from the secondary terminal to the coil frame. When the secondary winding is tested in these coils, the ohmmeter must be connected from the secondary coil terminal to the coil frame or to the ground wire terminal extending from the coil frame. Many secondary windings have 8,000 to 20,000 ohms resistance, but the meter readings must be compared to the manufacturer's specifications. The ohmmeter tests do not indicate such defects as defective insulation around the coil windings, which causes high-voltage leaks. Therefore, an accurate indication of coil condition is the coil maximum voltage output test with a test spark plug connected from the coil secondary wire to ground as explained in the no-start diagnosis.
__________________
FORD_if_acation88
 

coulrophobian

New member
Joined
Jul 9, 2009
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Sacramento
Vehicle Year
1989
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9
How about swapping the stock 2.9 radiator for a dual row from an Explorer? I did it to my 89 2.9L Ranger and it stays super cool (I think we have all read an article or two about these engines getting hot!). I got the radiator out of a 92 4.0L Explorer. If I remember correctly, the lower hose was almost identical, but the upper hose needed some modification (2.9 radiator nipple came straight out, whereas the 4.0 radiator nipple came out at an angle towards the passenger fender). I used the 92 Explorer upper hose and cut about an inch off of the thermostat side, and cut off just passed the second bend of the radiator side. Perfect fit!
 
Last edited:

low_five

New member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Kodiak, AK
Vehicle Year
1988
Vehicle
Ranger
Engine Size
2.9
the best modification for keeping your ranger running cool is to drive it in Alaska.
 

gaz

New member
Joined
Sep 21, 2007
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Wa, Bremerton 98310
Vehicle Year
1987
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9l
Best performance enhancing component for 2,9l

Of all the parts, bolt-ons and performance parts I have used on the Ford 2.9l 60 degree V6 engines, one stands out far from the rest. Replacing the crankcase driven fan with a suitable electric fan. This freed up more noticable power than any other single change or component i have used.

#2, free flow muffler
#3, replacement style K+N air filter
#4, computer chip; I rate the Hypertech chip higher than the JET but only because the fuel mileage has been better with the Hypertech.
#5, Accell 300+ digital ignition
#6, rocker spacers
#7, synthetic fluids all around
#8, corrected gear ratio (what ever gears it takes to make the vehilce run the same engine speed @ 60 as with stock tires is CORRECT).
#9, monitoring correct tire pressure
#10, increase ratio rockers, good for towing at highway speeds

The Utilmate performance part surprised me and actually weighs in above the electric fan in "overall performance" = having the heads (new style) and intake manifolds port and polished and Flo-matched on the a flow bench. This along with the computer chip made everything else work to it's full potential. I wish I had done it 20 years ago.

Three additional gems are the Ford factory Hi-Rider 2 Inch Suspension lift, Skyjacker front suspension coils and James Duff dual shocks all around for cornering and roll control.
 

dpete

New member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Roswell, NM
Vehicle Year
1988
Vehicle
Ford bronco II
Engine Size
2.9L
Suspension Style
4wd
corretions

Just correcting the spelling and wording would be a big help. For example: Under 2.9 what works in the TB section there is a statement.....and tend to increase power in the 3k and up range, without one of these....I did this and got much more than 3hp if that is what is being said. In the 30hp range? That may be a bit much, but I sure can feel it in the seat of my pants when I get on it.
 

Dube_77

New member
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Belleville, MI
Vehicle Year
1987
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9l v6
Need to let people know that it's not worn cam bearings or air in the lifters
that is causing the infamous ticking.
What is causing the ticking is clogged rocker armshafts that is restricting oil flow, thus causing lifters to wear out and tick because of poor oil circulation.:icon_thumby:
Is there a way to clean those out without tearin the engine down?
 

Dube_77

New member
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Belleville, MI
Vehicle Year
1987
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9l v6
My understanding is that the egr does not even come into play until you have let off the throttle then it resurculates the exhaust gas. So there is no need to disconnect it. it is not stealing any power.
I have a plug in my EGR valve and if i take it out u can hear it open when u get on the throttle. ive noticed a helluva difference in acceleration with it suckin clean air instead of exhaust
 

ronclark

New member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Woodland, WA
Vehicle Year
1987
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
95 4.0 with 93 ECU
I cant figure out my 2.9L it ticks after a freeway or hard run. it never ticks at start-up.
I have plenty oil pressure. at start-up 40psi. even after a freeway run i have 20psi at idle.
I could never figure out out.
 

Psychopete

New member
Joined
Aug 10, 2007
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
36
Location
Fort Wayne, Indiana
Vehicle Year
1987
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
NONE
Mine would tick after a high way run pretty loudly. This was shortly after I cracked a head and kept driving the truck. Pretty sure that coolant ate up my bearings.. Rebuilt and the issue went away, but I wouldn't recommend rebuild considering the age and alternatives (I rebuilt mine maybe 7-8 years ago).
 

nwstal

New member
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
86
Vehicle
Ford
One thing Ive found and it isnt mentioned anywhere is The rocker shafts all get all their of their oil from the center Shaft pedestal:


Which then has to pass through here:


Now to me this maybe the main reason for starving the top end of oil and I for one will be modifying the oil passages slightly The shafts may get plugged regardless but it may help if they got better supply
 

RyanL

New member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
'89
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9L
Hello, I just registered here (didn't realize that there was still forums dedicated to these trucks). I've had a little experience tinkering around with these trucks; I had an '88 ages ago and me and my wife bought a '89 about 5 years ago real cheap which needed a bunch of TLC. It ended up having cracked heads and a bunch of other miscellaneous problems which most are fixed now. It's served its purpose a few times in the little snow storms here in Maryland and the occasional lugging large crap around. It just got an upgraded u-joint style rear drive shaft (it was going around clicking horribly all this time!) and am in the process of replacing the rear leaf springs with explorer ones (the shackle/leaf spring bolts were worn and rusty so I had to order some from Fastenal). Anyway, enough with the history. I searched around a little and didn't find much info, but do any of you know if the valve timing can be altered a little on these motors? My next little project is to rip off the grill and radiator to replace the front engine seal, but while I was in there, advancing the valve timing for a little extra low end. Do any of you guys know if this would throw a code or what? With a manual transmission these Bronco IIs really suck starting out. Also one other question while we're on performance; does slapping on a '86 throttle body make much of a difference too? There's a guy around here selling a bunch of bronco II parts and I might grab one off of him this weekend. Thanks for reading my painfully long post and I appreciate any suggestions.
Edit:
One last question while I got your guys attention; how much of a PIA is it to get to the oil pan gasket with the motor in a 4WD. It looks to me like I may have to unbolt the motor from the motor mounts and jack it up a little to get the pan around that front end.
 
Last edited:

RyanL

New member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
'89
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9L
Well, I had a chance to mess with the valve timing (I believe that I advanced it one link) and I'm probably going to change it right back. It has some low RPM spark knock and seems to have lost power if anything. Sorry to get anyone's hopes up, but that seems like a waste of time. It looks like I have the oil leaks tackled now, but if it has oil consumption (I'll actually be able to tell now) I'll consider rebuilding it. I saw that putting 2.8L pistons in the 2.9 increases compression in that one 2.9L performance faq, but no details about it. Are they direct bolt in or does it require machine work or different connecting rods?
 

Sultan

New member
Joined
Apr 29, 2009
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Sultan, WA
Vehicle Year
1986
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
2.9
Often when people buy these trucks there some egine problems to deal with. I think it would be great is there was infomation to help people decide on which route to take. Should they rebuild the current engine, buy a reman engine or sawp in a 4.0 or 5.0.

Also it would be great to get info on reman engine companies. That said it seems like few go this route.

Thanks. RS
 

hilltopfarm

New member
Joined
Aug 30, 2011
Messages
0
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
NW WA
Vehicle Year
2003/1988
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
4.0L/2.9L
My 88 2.9 has a ticking sound that seems to be coming from the injectors. Also as one member said before, a clear PICTURE of the SPOUT connector would be nice. It took me a while to find one on one of the forums. It would also be nice to have a "gas tank capacities" section. I found info saying that I have a 13.5, 14.5 15 and 17 gallon tank...
 
Last edited:

Top