•  

    Click HERE to join our forum and participate in the discussions.

     

1988 B2 Conversion using 2000 Explorer 302


dSINtia

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Thanks SVT! Obviously still working through my plan (and learning). I'll go with the 180. Will I be able to utilize the B2's cruise system? I'll do a few searches and see what I can come up with...

On the block plates... These are original mounts from an 87-93 5.0L Mustang? If so, a set from Rockauto is under 20 bucks...
 


RangerSVT

Oct 09 OTOTM
Supporting Member
1000+ Watt Stereo
Joined
Mar 15, 2009
Messages
0
Reaction score
6
Points
0
Location
TRS since 2002 - NW TN
Vehicle Year
1996
2002
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
GT-40 5.0L EFI W/AC
The cruise control system does not use or rely on the ECU, so there is a very good chance you can use the original system. If your set on using the mustang mounts, 87-93 mustang convertible mounts are the ones that are used...

SVT
 

dSINtia

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Nope... Not set on anything Mustang. I'd prefer to use what you're recommending... The block plate mounts but I'm not sure what model vehicle from 87-93 years. I'm in no position to go my own way on this deal and I won't turn
down good, free advice... :)
 
Last edited:

RangerSVT

Oct 09 OTOTM
Supporting Member
1000+ Watt Stereo
Joined
Mar 15, 2009
Messages
0
Reaction score
6
Points
0
Location
TRS since 2002 - NW TN
Vehicle Year
1996
2002
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
GT-40 5.0L EFI W/AC
The plate style uses a flat plate that bolts to the engine and sets down on the stock ranger 2.9/ 4.0 rubber mounts. It allows you to drop the engine in once opposed to several times using the mustang mounts (one to mark the hole, pull the motor, drill hole for mustang mount, then lower motor back in truck, if not sitting right front to back, pull motor back out, re drill/enlarge hole, etc). The plate is slotted for easy adjustability without pulling the motor, it also retains stock original motor mounts for easy replacement wear items. Easy to make...

SVT
 

dSINtia

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Points
0
This makes a lot of sense. I'll search the forums for info... I have access to a weld shop so fabrication won't be an issue if I can get a hold of some drawings...
 

dSINtia

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Points
0
On SVT's advice, I've been looking for drawings or specifications for plate style motor mounts planning to build a set out of 3/8" steel and I ran across these:

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/aaf-all38112/applications/

For just $33 it seems easier for me to use if they are decent and will work correctly. Does anyone have any experience with these or similar plates? Will these work? Thanks in advance.

D2
 

dSINtia

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Sorry for the persistent questions but I got to thinking about the motor coming out of the donor. It is a relatively low mile 302 and ran great. It ran at temperature, didn't smoke or burn oil and had good oil pressure and I haven't noticed any leaks.

I have a stand and am not in a hurry to jump in to the B2, so why not take the opportunity to run through the engine to make sure it is good? What should I consider replacing? Keep in mind I am not after performance, just the durability and dependability expected of a stock motor.

I'm planning on doing valve cover gaskets, plugs, wires, hoses, t-stat and the belt but what else would you all recommend? Main seals? Oil pump? Injectors?

Appreciate the help...
 
Last edited:

RangerSVT

Oct 09 OTOTM
Supporting Member
1000+ Watt Stereo
Joined
Mar 15, 2009
Messages
0
Reaction score
6
Points
0
Location
TRS since 2002 - NW TN
Vehicle Year
1996
2002
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
GT-40 5.0L EFI W/AC
Dont think those plates will work. If your gonna pull the oil pan, high pressure pump is what id install, as well as check the ods and main bearings, crank end play, etc.rear main seal, timing cover seal, valve cover seals (basically, reseal the entire motor while its out) including freeze plugs...

SVT
 

dSINtia

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Thanks SVT.

I'll plan to do all of that... I'll be swapping on the dual sump and pickup anyhow so a high pressure pump will be super easy. Thanks!

D2
 

dSINtia

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Points
0
So I've been working on cleaning and doing a soft rebuild on this motor and as I prepare to get it all wired up (remember I'm essentially converting it from a 2000 to a 1997 electronically) I come to the Camshaft Synchronizer and Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor. The 2000 uses a 2-wire CMP sensor (sometimes referred to as a CKP or CPS) and the 1997 a 3-wire. Initial suggestions were that the CPS simply needed to be changed but after lots of research (always fun) I've learned that when converting to the 3-wire CPS it isn't as simple as swapping the sensor so I wanted to offer what I've gleaned in case someone else may be faced with similar issues...

Anyhow, the differences in the CPS and matching synchronizer are more significant than the number of wires. I've learned those wires actually do stuff... who knew? Anyways, both CPS are of the Variable Reluctance Synchronizer (VRS) type. The 2-wire CPS is used with a VRS whereas the 3-wire is used with the Hall-Effect VRS... the CPS' and synchronizers ARE NOT interchangeable as the signals produced are significantly different when compared to one another not to mention the rotating "vane" atop the block mounted synchronizer is of drastically different size and thickness when comparing the two. Both synchronizers produce A/C current. The VRS produces a standard speed-sensitive sine wave while the Hall-Effect produces a square sine wave, hence the use of three wires vice two. The VRS' vane is a single pole (interrupter) ~1/4" in width and 1/8" in thickness and the "Hall" has a larger but thinner "c-shaped" semi-circle vane approximately 1" in length and 1/16" in thickness.

I was forced to review all of this because once I learned I needed to swap my synchronizer (not difficult) I was confused by the differences I noticed when I was getting ready to remove the old and "stab" the new one... without the handy-dandy little tool. Again not too difficult, simply a matter of making a few marks and going at it but I wasn't sure where, in relation to the synchronizer vane I needed to mark... the middle of the vane, the leading edge of the vane, the back edge of the vane. The answer is this:

If you have to change from a VRS to Hall-Effect synchronizer and do not have the tool, mark the position of the synchronizer relative to the placement of the old one in the block and make a matching and corresponding mark on the replacement Hall synchronizer (be precise). Next bring the motor to TDC #1 cylinder (the VRS vane will align right in the middle of the "window") and make a mark on the block and synchronizer body relative to the center of the VRS vane (transpose this mark to the very same position on your new synchronizer) - you now have two marks on your block that will tell you where to land both the synchronizer body (already marked) and vane. Remove the old synchronizer and DO NOT rotate the motor. Your goal is to stab the Hall-effect synchronizer into the position that will leave the leading edge of the vane aligned with the "vane" mark you made previously on the body. Holding the new Hall-effect synchronizer in your hand, rotate the shaft counter-clockwise until the leading edge of the vane aligns with the mark you previously made being sure to hold the vane in place as you "stab" the synchronizer. Start ~15 degrees counter-clockwise from where you want to land the leading edge of the vane then you'll need to rotate the synchronizer clockwise ~15 degrees into the motor as it engages the teeth, being sure not to allow the vane to shift orientation. The body of the synchronizer can and will move... no biggie, just adjust it after your synchronizer is seated until the mark you made on the body lines up with the mark on the block. If all is done correctly, the synchronizer will look to be in the very position as the old one and the leading edge of the Hall-effect vane will line up with the mark you made on both the block and housing.

I'm sure in my head this all makes sense - if not, hell at least I have it for posterity. Maybe everybody already knew all of this stuff but I didn't and I'm betting someone else out there will have to deal with it at some point so here it is...

Or I guess you could just get the damn tool from OTC or SirTools... eBizzle has'em for $30.

Anyhow, I hope this helps someone...

D2
 

RangerSVT

Oct 09 OTOTM
Supporting Member
1000+ Watt Stereo
Joined
Mar 15, 2009
Messages
0
Reaction score
6
Points
0
Location
TRS since 2002 - NW TN
Vehicle Year
1996
2002
Vehicle
Ford
Engine Size
GT-40 5.0L EFI W/AC
I bought the syncro from rock auto and the alignment tool came with it...

SVT
 

dSINtia

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Points
0
I looked into buying a new one as I knew the tool would come with it but MAC came through like a champ and sent me one with the a replacement 3-wire sensor. Both of you guys have been awesome... thanks!
 

Top